basedgod-fuckedmybitch:

The shoe that started it all…. In 1972 Bill Bowerman used his wife’s waffle iron to mold the sole of a shoe that has better traction, creating a shoe called the ‘Moon Shoe’ and distributed it to four track & field athletes at the 1972 Olympic Trials.
That same year the first line of Nike footwear hit the stores.
In 1978 Blue Ribbon Sports is renamed Nike Inc. 

basedgod-fuckedmybitch:

The shoe that started it all….
In 1972 Bill Bowerman used his wife’s waffle iron to mold the sole of a shoe that has better traction, creating a shoe called the ‘Moon Shoe’ and distributed it to four track & field athletes at the 1972 Olympic Trials.

That same year the first line of Nike footwear hit the stores.

In 1978 Blue Ribbon Sports is renamed Nike Inc. 

(via irun2much)

nextbestrunner:

Brittney Reese wins gold for US in the long jump!

nextbestrunner:

Brittney Reese wins gold for US in the long jump!

(via feministfitspo)

discoverynews:

How Do Olympians Keep Getting Better?

In the first week of competition at this year’s Olympic Games, nine world records fell in the swimming pool, including 17-year old Missy Franklin’s new standard in the 200-meter backstroke and Rebeccas Soni’s personal best in the 200 breaststroke, even though many of the previous records were set by swimmers wearing now-banned extra-bouyant suits.
“There is almost certainly a species limit in terms of physical capabilities, and I suspect we might be in the range of that,” said Carl Foster, an exercise physiologist at the University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse. “But every time scientists say humans are not going to go any faster, they’ve been shown to be wrong. You can take that one to the bank.”

speed over here to see more…

discoverynews:

How Do Olympians Keep Getting Better?

In the first week of competition at this year’s Olympic Games, nine world records fell in the swimming pool, including 17-year old Missy Franklin’s new standard in the 200-meter backstroke and Rebeccas Soni’s personal best in the 200 breaststroke, even though many of the previous records were set by swimmers wearing now-banned extra-bouyant suits.

“There is almost certainly a species limit in terms of physical capabilities, and I suspect we might be in the range of that,” said Carl Foster, an exercise physiologist at the University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse. “But every time scientists say humans are not going to go any faster, they’ve been shown to be wrong. You can take that one to the bank.”

speed over here to see more…

olympics:

Usain Bolt of Jamaica celebrates after winning gold in the Men’s 200m Final. 

Photo by Harry How/Getty Images

olympics:

Usain Bolt of Jamaica celebrates after winning gold in the Men’s 200m Final.


Photo by Harry How/Getty Images

(via olympicmoments)

healthybuddha:

Is she not the most beautiful specimen of athleticism? Kerri Walsh-Jennings is a goddess, I’m pretty sure. 
Undefeated in Athens. Took gold. Undefeated in Beijing. Took gold. Are you ready London?

healthybuddha:

Is she not the most beautiful specimen of athleticism? Kerri Walsh-Jennings is a goddess, I’m pretty sure. 

Undefeated in Athens. Took gold. Undefeated in Beijing. Took gold. Are you ready London?

(Source: olympicsusa, via bethanydoeslife)

Sarah Attar of Saudi Arabia walks off the track after competing in the Women’s 800m Round 1 Heats.

Sarah Attar of Saudi Arabia walks off the track after competing in the Women’s 800m Round 1 Heats.

(Source: NPR)

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica on her way to winning gold in the Women’s 100-metre final on Saturday.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica on her way to winning gold in the Women’s 100-metre final on Saturday.

(Source: theprovince.com)

Carmelita Jeter reacts after winning her semifinal heat of the women’s 100 meters.

Carmelita Jeter reacts after winning her semifinal heat of the women’s 100 meters.

(Source: Washington Post)

Shelley-Ann Fraser-Pryce from Jamaica reacts after winning the women’s 100m final.

Shelley-Ann Fraser-Pryce from Jamaica reacts after winning the women’s 100m final.

(Source: olympics.runnersworld.com)

United States’ Carmelita Jeter competes in a women’s 200-meter semifinal during the athletics in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012.

United States’ Carmelita Jeter competes in a women’s 200-meter semifinal during the athletics in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012.

(Source: Washington Post)